Gold Pinch Pots

Sometimes I get an overwhelming urge to make something. Something satisfyingly quick and easy. I recently bought my daughter some Fimo, and spotted that they also do a modelling clay. I'm really lucky to have a large, well stocked, craft and haberdashery shop a five minute walk away, so when my 'I need to make something' mood struck, I went and bought some.

I decided to make some little pinch pots for the succulents I've been attempting to propagate. I had about fifteen  leaves that had sprouted roots and the beginnings of new plants that needed to be potted, so these are a great size whilst they're still tiny. If they're successful, I'll have to re-pot them eventually, but for now these are perfect.  These little pots would also be great for rings, and any other tiny bits and pieces, and they're so easy.



I made meat-ball sized balls with the clay once I'd softened it up a bit, and pinched them into various shaped, rough little vessels. Perfectly imperfect. They took about 48 hours to dry (not the 24 that it promises on the pack and which was the selling point for Miss Impatient over here), and once completely dry I sprayed them gold.  I lined them with a double layer of foil and filled them with succulent potting mix before adding my new little plant-babies.  I apologise for the cringe-inducing term plant-babies - I started saying it to annoy my husband and amuse myself, and it's kind of stuck. Besides, I do love them.

Succulents love our bathroom, and the tiny pots are the perfect size to sit on the marble ledge behind the basin, where they will hopefully thrive.  We'll see over the coming weeks, how many of them make it. Fingers crossed!

Its hard to tell from the photograph, but this pot is only about 6 centimetres in diameter. Pretty cute huh?

The 'new' house plants every self-respecting interior obsessive must have!

I know the title is a tad dramatic, and yes, you've seen some of these loads already, BUT I do think that you will start seeing a few house plants popping up online, in the glossies, and yes, even in real life over the coming months, that you just might not have seen before. And I'm excited.

It's feeling decidedly Autumnal in the UK suddenly (Boo! I want more summer!), but let's not let that fact spoil our indoor plant fun. In fact, surely if we surround ourselves with plants that have a tropical feel, and pop the heating on, on the days when the sun graces us with a bit of shine, we can trick ourselves into believing it's still warm out there.  Maybe?

Yes? Let's give it a go then...

We already know that succulents are a 'thing', and that indoor plants have made a huge comeback over the last year or so, having been absent from the interiors hot list for quite some time, but what plants should you buy, once your little succulent collection is nearly complete? Or, god forbid, dead?
Image: Unknown via Pinterest
Ananas comosus chamaca / Ananas comosus variegatus - Dwarf Pineapple/Ivory Pineapple. I was stupidly excited (told you) when I saw these at Ikea the other week. I can't believe that I just didn't have the hands to buy a couple there and then. I'll definitely be making a trip back for some very soon. The Variegatus has a spiky/variegated leaf, the one pictured (Chamaca) doesn't.  They're both great. Instant sunshine in a pot, and a total no-brainer. Get one.

Image: Unknown via Pinterest
Zamioculcas zamifolia or Zamia furfuracea - That's a Zamia Plant to you and me, and also known as a Cardboard Plant, Jamaican Sago and ZZ Plant. It was complete and utter love at first sight for me when I recently saw one of these for the first time. Just beautiful.  I'll be tracking one of these sculptural beauties down pronto. Oops, just did - you can buy one here.


Image: Unknown via Pinterest

Cryptocereus anthonyanus (yes, really) - also known as a Ric Rac Cactus, Fishbone Cactus or Orchid Cactus. It's seemingly impossible to find a great image of one of these to show off it's beauty, so I'll post one once I've procured one, but trust me, these are stunning. I'm going to hang one in my kitchen, and pray it's warm enough for it as we venture into winter.

Image: Kindra Clineff (via countryliving.com)

Kalanchoe thyrsiflora - This one is probably not new to you, but it's new to me. I've decided I need to stop being lazy and calling all succulents, 'succulents', and learn their names (even if I can't pronounce them). We need to know our Aloes and Agaves from our Echeverias and Crassulaceaes, which is the family that this lovely looking specimen falls in to. Commonly known as a Paddle Plant for obvious reasons, and it's totally on my list.

Fiddle Leaf Fig, and if you squint you can see a Zamia peeping out from behind it.
Image: Bianca Hall
And last, but most definitely not least, this one is probably not new to you - we all know and lust after the Fiddle Leaf Fig (or Ficus lyrata if you want to get technical). I actually gasped out loud at the beauty of the one above when I stumbled upon it, having never seen one in the flesh before. How does a plant or tree reach A-list celebrity status? By being incredibly beautiful and photogenic for a start. If ever there was an A-list plant, this is it. Why haven't I got one yet? Because they're not cheap, and I'm terrified of buying one and killing it. This won't stop me from ever getting one, it's Christmas soon after all. Kimberly over at Swoon Worthy discovered an online UK Fiddle Leaf Fig supplier and was kind enough to share back in March. She tells me that hers is doing really well, which fills me with hope for my future as the proud owner of one. Soon, very soon.